Resources

There are many documented reports from the 1980s through to today, across state, territory and Commonwealth governments, calling for the return of birthing services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

At the same time there are reports that show our maternity services are not equitable across Australia and that increasing numbers of babies are being born before arriving to hospital.

Birthing on Country re-enactment.

Caring 4 Mum on Country project.

Photograph: Pat Josse

 

Resources

HSRAANZ Webinar Recording Now Available – Reducing preterm birth for First Nations babies through im

HSRAANZ Webinar Recording Now Available – Reducing preterm birth for First Nations babies through im

Birthing on Country is a metaphor for the best start in life for Aboriginal and Torres Strait babies and their families. Birthing on Country Services are recommended in national policy and described as maternity and family health services that are philosophically aligned to an Aboriginal world view, co-designed with community, enable Indigenous governance, connection with land, country and traditional practice; and are provided by a culturally competent workforce.

Birthing on Country in an urban context

Birthing on Country in an urban context

“A birthing place is … around ceremony, it is about cultural interconnectedness… where we revitilise and renew our traditional practices for mother and babies… we can’t do that in a hospital… … just because we sit in an urban setting doesn’t mean we can’t bring back those things….It is a humanistic thing… it is a connection to country… its the start of our first ceremony.” - Jody Currie, CEO ATSICHS Brisbane

WOMEN'S BUSINESS MEETING

WOMEN'S BUSINESS MEETING

A women’s business meeting was hosted by Danila Dilba Biluru Butji Binnilutlum in 1998 as a part of the Remote Area Birthing Project, which aimed to develop an approach to birthing to improve birth outcomes and experiences for Aboriginal people and improve the quality of hospital and remote community-based services.

Returning birthing services to communities and Aboriginal control: Aboriginal women of Shoalhaven Il

Returning birthing services to communities and Aboriginal control: Aboriginal women of Shoalhaven Il

Journal of Indigenous Wellbeing Te Mauri- Pimatisiwin Volume 5, Issue 1 Article 5, May 2020

AND THE WOMEN SAID...

AND THE WOMEN SAID...

Prevention of avoidable preterm birth in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) families is a major public health priority in Australia.

BIRTHING ON COUNTRY WORKSHOP REPORT

BIRTHING ON COUNTRY WORKSHOP REPORT

The Birthing on Country Workshop was held in Alice Springs on 4 July 2012. The report was prepared under the auspices of the Australian Health Ministers' Advisory Council.

BIRTHING ON COUNTRY MATERNITY SERVICE DELIVERY MODELS: A RAPID REVIEW

BIRTHING ON COUNTRY MATERNITY SERVICE DELIVERY MODELS: A RAPID REVIEW

The Maternity Services Interjurisdictional Committee tasked the Sax Institute to conduct a literature review on Birthing on Country.

GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR DEVELOPING A BIRTHING ON COUNTRY SERVICE MODEL AND EVALUATION FRAMEWORK PHASE

GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR DEVELOPING A BIRTHING ON COUNTRY SERVICE MODEL AND EVALUATION FRAMEWORK PHASE

The Australian Health Minister’s Advisory Committee endorsed this report providing guidance on issues and considerations for the development of a Birthing on Country service.

BIRTHING ON COUNTRY POSITION STATEMENT

BIRTHING ON COUNTRY POSITION STATEMENT

In recognition of the slow progress towards Birthing on Country, three organisations (Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses and Midwives, CRANAplus and the Australian College of Midwives) released a call to action in March 2016.

BIRTHING BUSINESS IN THE BUSH

BIRTHING BUSINESS IN THE BUSH

An archived website developed by the women of Maningrida, Arnhem Land that tells their birthing stories. It was developed as a resource for health professionals.

BIRTHING ON COUNTRY: AN ELUSIVE IDEAL?

BIRTHING ON COUNTRY: AN ELUSIVE IDEAL?

Being born on country connects an Aboriginal person to the land and community in a deeply cultural way and affords life-long privileges such as hunting and fishing rights, as well as life long responsibilities for looking after country, both land and people. For Aboriginal women, birthing has moved from the personal to the political as governments provide policies about what is 'best' for Aboriginal women and their babies.

OUTCOMES OF THE 'BIRTHING ON COUNTRY' YARNING CIRCLES

OUTCOMES OF THE 'BIRTHING ON COUNTRY' YARNING CIRCLES

CATSINAM's December 2014 annual conference used yarning circles to explore Birthing on Country.

ABORIGINAL WOMEN'S CHOICE TO GIVE BIRTH ON COUNTRY

ABORIGINAL WOMEN'S CHOICE TO GIVE BIRTH ON COUNTRY

An article by Aboriginal academics.

PAPERBARK AND PINARD

PAPERBARK AND PINARD

A historical account of maternity care in one remote Aboriginal Australian town.

AUSTRALIAN COLLEGE OF MIDWIVES

AUSTRALIAN COLLEGE OF MIDWIVES

The Australian College of Midwives has a Birthing on Country project.

HSRAANZ Awards 2019

HSRAANZ Awards 2019

Winner Best Overall Quantitative Paper – Sue Kildea

A NATIONAL ABORIGINAL HEALTH SERVICE

A NATIONAL ABORIGINAL HEALTH SERVICE

NAHS 1989 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

A NATIONAL ABORIGINAL HEALTH SERVICE

A NATIONAL ABORIGINAL HEALTH SERVICE

NAHS 1989 PREFACE

A NATIONAL ABORIGINAL HEALTH SERVICE

A NATIONAL ABORIGINAL HEALTH SERVICE

NAHS 1989 TABLE OF CONTENTS

Birthing on Country in an urban context

Birthing on Country in an urban context

“A birthing place is … around ceremony, it is about cultural interconnectedness… where we revitilise and renew our traditional practices for mother and babies… we can’t do that in a hospital… … just because we sit in an urban setting doesn’t mean we can’t bring back those things….It is a humanistic thing… it is a connection to country… its the start of our first ceremony.” - Jody Currie, CEO ATSICHS Brisbane

Birthing on Country and Indigenous men

Birthing on Country and Indigenous men

“I have nine daughters, I was present for most of them at the birth… and I still stand here today to say that the institutions of health and education are the most racist in this country, … they are so white, they got no idea…. we can’t rely on the mainstream.” - Tiga Bayles, Radio Host, ‘Let’s Talk’

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Birthing on Country acknowledges the traditional custodians across the lands on which we live and work, and we pay our respects to Elders both past and present.

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